Surveillance Totale

Bonjour et bienvenue sur ce site de discussion consacré à Surveillance Totale, le programme américain le plus démesuré et sans doute le plus contestable, de lutte contre le terrorisme, par la mise sous fiche de la planète toute entière.

Cet espace est le vôtre. N’hésitez pas à y exprimer vos réactions, commentaires et critiques éventuelles de mon livre.

Jacques Henno

U.S. build a cyber "ligne Maginot"

Here is an article about TIA which I wrote for the January 28, 2004 issue of Les Echos, which is the leading business daily newspaper in France with an average paid circulation of 118,000 copies per issue.

FRENCH

Column: Les Echos innovation

Headline: Survey – U.S. build a cyber « ligne Maginot »

Introductory paragraph: To fight the terrorism which targets its country, the U.S. government is developing new software and hardware. But some experts think that they will not be effective, and others fear that they will endanger human rights.

Text:

A month ago, at Christmas time, the French government, alerted by the U.S. information agencies, cancelled six Air France flights to Los Angeles. By cross-referencing the files of the passengers with their own databases, Washington, D.C.’s intelligence agencies believed they held a suspect. In fact, there had been a homonym. A terrorist name had been badly transcribed, then confused with the name of a passenger.

This error illustrates the difficulties raised by the incredible technological challenge into which Washington will blow hundreds of millions dollars: to develop information processing systems able to detect in advance any Al-Qaida action. This program has a tactical and technical postulate. The first conviction is to apply to the anti-terrorist fight a method already used against other forms of criminality, in particular against money laundering: identify the criminals by tracing messages they have exchanged with commercial partners (banks, airlines, hotels, etc.). «All commercial transactions must be exploited to discover the terrorists. These people emit a signal we must spot among other transactions. It’s very similar to the anti-submarine fight where it is necessary to locate the submarines among an ocean of noises», a high-level manager at the U.S. Department of Defense explains.

Confidence in technology

The second conviction is technological: the data-processing tools will be soon powerful enough to analyze all materials that are electronically exchanged in the world. American history is marked by technological prowess, from the transcontinental railroad to the space shuttle. It should come as no surprise, then, that few are questioning this new application of data processing. «Confidence in the technique is one of the characteristics of the American people», Guillaume Parmentier, director of the French Center on the United States, affiliated with the Ifri (French Institute of the international relations) recalls. «It is even truer in the governmental circles close to the business world. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld believes that technology can solve everything.» «That’s not a dream», advances a researcher in data processing, who knows U.S. intelligence agencies. «With Echelon, their giant network of scanners, the federal agencies are able to listen to the majority of messages exchanged in a digital form, in a country. Admittedly, afterwards, it is necessary to transcribe and sort all the files. But these experts can already analyze all the TV or radio waves in the United States, with a 20 percent margin of error. Then, making a kind of Google for spies, by indexing all the electronic communications exchanged in the world, is no longer science fiction.»

Pre-selection of the passengers

In this enormous machinery, identification of the passengers is the least difficult problem. The federal government will invest $710 million in the US-VISIT (United States Visitor and Immigrating Status Indicator Technology) program which will make it possible to check, thanks to biometrics, the prints of the tourists in possession of a visa. And a system of pre-selection of the passengers by computer, called CAPPS 2 (Computer Assisted Passenger Pre-screening System 2), is being tested in some airports. It gathers all the data available on travelers and allots to them a color code according to their estimated risk. Cost? More than $164 million.

But, in order to give the alarm appropriately, these systems must be fed with reliable information. All software programs used in the information chain must be re-examined. You need to translate the very diverse information, provided by allied governments; handed over gracefully (that’s the case of the airline files), or for payment, indirectly by corporations; or intercepted by the Echelon network. Then, you have to aggregate these data scattered between 22 agencies (Department of Homeland Security, Department of State, Department of Defense…), to cross and analyze the whole. «It’s the concept of data mining, but applied to an unimaginable quantity of information», explains Serge Abiteboul, specialist, at INRIA (French Institute of Research in Data Processing). «Thanks to data mining you can find interesting information without knowing where it is and without knowing what to look for». It reveals behavior schemes which were not expected and can be used in a predictive manner. Some of the best experts in data mining are precisely in the U.S., in particular at IBM…

Patriotism and business

So, in the background, tens of researchers from corporations or university laboratories develop a system for monitoring the world. Close to Los Angeles, the company Language Weaver sharpens more reliable translation software based on statistical algorithms. The Center for Natural Language Processing, located at the University of New York-Syracuse is polishing a program which will identify suspect behaviors. In Atlanta, Nexidia researches audio-video data. In California’s Silicon Valley, Insight improves software for collecting information. Meanwhile, Andrew Moore and Jeff Schneider at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie-Mellon University research data mining; and Virginia’s firm SRA International develops ways to extract data. Etc, etc.

Financing? No problem. Since September 11, 2001, public funds devoted to this kind of research have been considerably increased. And private investors see this as a good way of reconciling patriotism and business. «In 2004, the federal agencies will devote more than $3,5 billion to R&D works related to national security, i.e. anti-terrorism», Serge Hagège, science and technology specialist, at the French Ambassy in the United States, calculates. In the private sector, a speculative mini-bubble has even formed around these activities of monitoring. «All the companies specialized in data mining are favored», says Timothy Quillin, a financial analyst at Stephens Bank and one of the rare experts of the defense and security computer industry. In stock markets, investors bet on companies able to propose complete computer solutions to federal agencies. In 2003, SRA International thus saw its action increasing by 40 percent.

Fears of the associations

This « speculative » fever has also contaminated the venture capitalists. Most of them have created funds devoted to defense and security. Best example? Homeland Security Fund, of Capital Paladin Group, in Washington, which finances protections of data-processing networks and software and audio-video file analysis. Two of the partners of Paladin know the needs of the intelligence agencies: James Woolsey directed the CIA and Kenneth Minihan managed the NSA (National Security Agency).

Motivated researchers, plenty of money… Apart from feasibility problems, it seems there is only one obstacle to the construction of this cyber « ligne Maginot » around the United States: American human rights defense associations. Under their pressure, the government gave up its preliminary draft to put the whole of humanity on file — or almost. «Our objective is to treat all the databases scattered in the world like only one file», hammered in October 2002, Admiral John Poindexter, then in charge, within the Department of Defense, of the IAO. This Information Awareness Office was supposed to spend almost $600 million over four years, to develop the TIA (Total Information Awareness), a gigantic system able to collect information on everybody. But this project caused such concern that the U.S. Congress put a stop to it last September. The federal administration officially did so. The IAO indeed disappeared from the official flowcharts, and the information agencies are forbidden to use any part of the TIA to spy on U.S. citizens in the United States. But for the other inhabitants of the planet, they seem to have carte blanche. And the $600 million of the IAO budget were probably moved somewhere… «The components of the TIA were dispersed between various federal agencies», estimates Steven Aftergood, in charge of Project on Government Secrecy, a division of the Federation of the American Scientists (3,000 members strong, including 50 Nobel Prize winners). As by chance, the Arda, the agency in charge of R&D within the U.S. intelligence community, currently finances a program called NIMD (Novel Intelligence from Massive Data), very similar, to the TIA

Jacques Henno

L'Amérique construit sa cyber « ligne Maginot »

Pour lutter contre le terrorisme visant son territoire, le gouvernement américain s’est lancé dans d’impressionnants développements informatiques. Certains doutent de leur efficacité et craignent pour les libertés publiques.

ENGLISH

Il y a un peu plus d’un mois, au moment de Noël, le gouvernement français, alerté par les agences de renseignement américaines, annulait six vols d’Air France pour Los Angeles. En croisant les fichiers des passagers avec leurs bases de données, les services secrets de Washington croyaient tenir un suspect. Il y aurait eu en fait une homonymie : le nom d’un terroriste aurait été mal transcrit, puis confondu avec celui d’un voyageur. Cette erreur illustre les difficultés que pose l’incroyable défi technologique relevé par Washington, à coups de centaines de millions de dollars : développer des systèmes informatiques capables de détecter à l’avance toute action d’Al-Qaida.

Ce programme repose sur un postulat tactique et technique. Il s’agit d’abord d’appliquer à la lutte antiterroriste une méthode déjà utilisée contre d’autres formes de criminalité, en particulier le blanchiment d’argent sale : identifier les criminels grâce aux messages qu’ils doivent échanger entre eux et avec des prestataires (banques, compagnies aériennes, hôtels, etc.). « Les transactions commerciales doivent être exploitées pour découvrir les terroristes, insiste un responsable du département américain de la Défense. Ces gens émettent forcément un signal qu’il nous faut capter parmi les autres transactions. C’est comparable à la lutte anti-sous-marins où il faut repérer les submersibles au milieu d’un océan de bruits. »

La seconde conviction est technologique : les outils informatiques seront bientôt assez puissants pour analyser tout ce qui se trame dans le monde. Aux Etats-Unis, dont l’histoire est jalonnée de prouesses techniques, des chemins de fer transcontinentaux aux navettes spatiales, penser cela n’a rien de surprenant. « La confiance dans la technique est une des caractéristiques du peuple américain, rappelle Guillaume Parmentier, directeur du Centre français sur les Etats-Unis, affilié à l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). C’est encore plus vrai dans les cercles gouvernementaux proches des milieux d’affaires. Donald Rumsfeld, le secrétaire à la Défense, croit que l’on peut tout résoudre par la technologie. »

Un chercheur en informatique connaissant bien les services de renseignement américains estime la chose techniquement possible : « Cela n’a rien d’une chimère. Avec Echelon, leur réseau d’antennes géantes, les agences fédérales sont capables d’intercepter la plupart des messages échangés dans un pays sous une forme numérique. Certes, après, il faut tout transcrire et trier… Mais ces experts savent déjà analyser toutes les émissions de télé ou de radio diffusées aux Etats-Unis, avec 20 % d’erreur. Alors, faire une sorte de « Google » des écoutes, en indexant toutes les communications électroniques échangées dans le monde, ce n’est plus de la science-fiction. »

Dans cette énorme machinerie, l’identification des passagers est le problème le moins difficile. Le gouvernement fédéral va investir 710 millions de dollars dans le programme US-Visit (United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology), qui va permettre de vérifier, grâce à la biométrie, les empreintes des touristes en possession d’un visa. Et un système de présélection des passagers par ordinateur, Capps 2 (Computer Assisted Passenger Pre-screening System 2), est en test dans quelques aéroports. Il rassemble les données disponibles sur les voyageurs et attribue à ces derniers un code couleur en fonction de leur dangerosité estimée. Coût : plus de 164 millions de dollars.

Pour que ces systèmes déclenchent l’alarme à bon escient, ils doivent être alimentés en informations fiables. Chaque logiciel impliqué dans la chaîne du renseignement doit être revu. Il faut traduire des informations d’origines très diverses : fournies par les gouvernements alliés, remises gracieusement (c’est le cas des fichiers des lignes aériennes) ou contre paiement par des entreprises commerciales, ou encore interceptées par Echelon. Puis, il faut agréger ces données éparpillées entre plusieurs dizaines d’agences (sécurité intérieure, affaires étrangères, défense…), les croiser et analyser le tout. « C’est du datamining, mais appliqué à une masse d’informations inimaginable, explique Serge Abiteboul, spécialiste de la gestion de données de très gros volume à l’Inria (Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique). La « fouille de données » peut permettre de découvrir des informations intéressantes sans savoir a priori où celles-ci se trouvent, ni même exactement à quoi s’attendre. » Elle révèle ainsi des schémas de comportement auxquels on n’avait pas a priori pensé, et permet de s’en servir ensuite de manière prédictive. Or, quelques-uns des meilleurs experts en datamining sont justement aux Etats-Unis, en particulier chez IBM.

Dans l’ombre, les chercheurs de dizaines d’entreprises ou de laboratoires universitaires travaillent ainsi à la mise au point d’un système de surveillance de la planète. La société Language Weaver affûte des logiciels de traduction plus fiables, tandis que le CNLP (Center for Natural Language Processing), de l’université de Syracuse (Etat de New York), peaufine un programme qui apprend à identifier les comportements suspects. A Atlanta, Nexidia planche sur les données audio-vidéo. Dans la Silicon Valley, Inxight améliore l’agrégation des informations. Andrew More et Jeff Schneider, de l’université Carnegie-Mellon, à Pittsburgh, combinent probabilités et datamining. En Virginie, la firme SRA International travaille sur l’extraction de données, etc.

Le financement ? Aucun problème. Depuis le 11 septembre 2001, les fonds publics consacrés à ces recherches ont été démultipliés. Et les investisseurs privés voient là un bon moyen de concilier patriotisme et business. « En 2004, rien qu’en recherche-développement, les agences fédérales vont consacrer plus de 3,5 milliards de dollars à la sécurité intérieure, c’est-à-dire à l’antiterrorisme », a calculé Serge Hagège, attaché pour la science et la technologie à l’ambassade de France aux Etats-Unis.

Dans le privé, une mini-bulle spéculative s’est même formée autour de ces activités de surveillance. « Toutes les entreprises qui travaillent dans le datamining ont le vent en poupe », confirme Timothy Quillin, analyste financier chez Stephens, une banque de gestion de portefeuilles et un des rares spécialistes de l’informatique de défense et de sécurité. En Bourse, les investisseurs parient sur les groupes proposant des solutions complètes aux agences fédérales. En 2003, SRA International a ainsi vu son action progresser de 40 %.

Mais cette fièvre sécuritaire a également contaminé le capital-risque, qui a vu éclore des fonds voués à la défense et à la sécurité. Modèle du genre ? Le Homeland Security Fund, de Paladin Capital Group, à Washington, qui finance la protection des réseaux informatiques et des logiciels ou l’analyse de fichiers audio et vidéo. Or, deux des patrons de Paladin connaissent bien les besoins des services secrets : James Woolsey a dirigé la CIA et Kenneth Minihan, la NSA (National Security Agency).

Des chercheurs motivés, de l’argent à profusion… En dehors des problèmes de faisabilité technique, il semble n’y avoir qu’un obstacle à la construction de cette cyber « ligne Maginot » autour des Etats-Unis : les associations américaines de défense des droits de l’homme (lire page suivante). Sous leur pression, le gouvernement a renoncé à son projet initial : mettre en fi
ches l’humanité ou presque. L’IAO (Information Awareness Office), dirigé par l’amiral John Poindexter et doté d’un budget de près de 600 millions de dollars sur quatre ans, devait développer le projet Total Information Awareness (TIA), un gigantesque système capable d’accumuler des informations sur n’importe quel individu.

En septembre dernier, le TIA a été officiellement arrêté devant l’inquiétude du Congrès, et les agences de renseignement ont interdiction d’utiliser ce qui existait déjà du projet pour espionner des citoyens américains aux Etats-Unis. Dans le même temps, l’IAO a disparu des organigrammes. Mais la retraite du gouvernement n’a été qu’une stratégie de façade. « Les composantes du TIA ont été dispersées entre différentes agences fédérales », estime Steven Aftergood, responsable de la mission « Secret d’Etat » au sein de la FAS, la Fédération des scientifiques américains (3.000 personnalités, dont 50 Prix Nobel). Et, comme par hasard, l’Arda (agence de recherche des services secrets américains) finance actuellement un programme, NIMD (Novel Intelligence from Massive Data), très proche du TIA…

Dernier épisode en date : la semaine dernière, George W. Bush a profité de son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union pour appeler les législateurs à renouveler certaines clauses du Patriot Act. Ces clauses, qui concernent la surveillance des communications électroniques des individus, étaient censées expirer fin 2005.

Jacques Henno (article paru dans le quotidien Les Echos le 28 janvier 2004)

L’Amérique construit sa cyber « ligne Maginot »

Pour lutter contre le terrorisme visant son territoire, le gouvernement américain s’est lancé dans d’impressionnants développements informatiques. Certains doutent de leur efficacité et craignent pour les libertés publiques.

ENGLISH

Il y a un peu plus d’un mois, au moment de Noël, le gouvernement français, alerté par les agences de renseignement américaines, annulait six vols d’Air France pour Los Angeles. En croisant les fichiers des passagers avec leurs bases de données, les services secrets de Washington croyaient tenir un suspect. Il y aurait eu en fait une homonymie : le nom d’un terroriste aurait été mal transcrit, puis confondu avec celui d’un voyageur. Cette erreur illustre les difficultés que pose l’incroyable défi technologique relevé par Washington, à coups de centaines de millions de dollars : développer des systèmes informatiques capables de détecter à l’avance toute action d’Al-Qaida.

Ce programme repose sur un postulat tactique et technique. Il s’agit d’abord d’appliquer à la lutte antiterroriste une méthode déjà utilisée contre d’autres formes de criminalité, en particulier le blanchiment d’argent sale : identifier les criminels grâce aux messages qu’ils doivent échanger entre eux et avec des prestataires (banques, compagnies aériennes, hôtels, etc.). « Les transactions commerciales doivent être exploitées pour découvrir les terroristes, insiste un responsable du département américain de la Défense. Ces gens émettent forcément un signal qu’il nous faut capter parmi les autres transactions. C’est comparable à la lutte anti-sous-marins où il faut repérer les submersibles au milieu d’un océan de bruits. »

La seconde conviction est technologique : les outils informatiques seront bientôt assez puissants pour analyser tout ce qui se trame dans le monde. Aux Etats-Unis, dont l’histoire est jalonnée de prouesses techniques, des chemins de fer transcontinentaux aux navettes spatiales, penser cela n’a rien de surprenant. « La confiance dans la technique est une des caractéristiques du peuple américain, rappelle Guillaume Parmentier, directeur du Centre français sur les Etats-Unis, affilié à l’Ifri (Institut français des relations internationales). C’est encore plus vrai dans les cercles gouvernementaux proches des milieux d’affaires. Donald Rumsfeld, le secrétaire à la Défense, croit que l’on peut tout résoudre par la technologie. »

Un chercheur en informatique connaissant bien les services de renseignement américains estime la chose techniquement possible : « Cela n’a rien d’une chimère. Avec Echelon, leur réseau d’antennes géantes, les agences fédérales sont capables d’intercepter la plupart des messages échangés dans un pays sous une forme numérique. Certes, après, il faut tout transcrire et trier… Mais ces experts savent déjà analyser toutes les émissions de télé ou de radio diffusées aux Etats-Unis, avec 20 % d’erreur. Alors, faire une sorte de « Google » des écoutes, en indexant toutes les communications électroniques échangées dans le monde, ce n’est plus de la science-fiction. »

Dans cette énorme machinerie, l’identification des passagers est le problème le moins difficile. Le gouvernement fédéral va investir 710 millions de dollars dans le programme US-Visit (United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology), qui va permettre de vérifier, grâce à la biométrie, les empreintes des touristes en possession d’un visa. Et un système de présélection des passagers par ordinateur, Capps 2 (Computer Assisted Passenger Pre-screening System 2), est en test dans quelques aéroports. Il rassemble les données disponibles sur les voyageurs et attribue à ces derniers un code couleur en fonction de leur dangerosité estimée. Coût : plus de 164 millions de dollars.

Pour que ces systèmes déclenchent l’alarme à bon escient, ils doivent être alimentés en informations fiables. Chaque logiciel impliqué dans la chaîne du renseignement doit être revu. Il faut traduire des informations d’origines très diverses : fournies par les gouvernements alliés, remises gracieusement (c’est le cas des fichiers des lignes aériennes) ou contre paiement par des entreprises commerciales, ou encore interceptées par Echelon. Puis, il faut agréger ces données éparpillées entre plusieurs dizaines d’agences (sécurité intérieure, affaires étrangères, défense…), les croiser et analyser le tout. « C’est du datamining, mais appliqué à une masse d’informations inimaginable, explique Serge Abiteboul, spécialiste de la gestion de données de très gros volume à l’Inria (Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique). La « fouille de données » peut permettre de découvrir des informations intéressantes sans savoir a priori où celles-ci se trouvent, ni même exactement à quoi s’attendre. » Elle révèle ainsi des schémas de comportement auxquels on n’avait pas a priori pensé, et permet de s’en servir ensuite de manière prédictive. Or, quelques-uns des meilleurs experts en datamining sont justement aux Etats-Unis, en particulier chez IBM.

Dans l’ombre, les chercheurs de dizaines d’entreprises ou de laboratoires universitaires travaillent ainsi à la mise au point d’un système de surveillance de la planète. La société Language Weaver affûte des logiciels de traduction plus fiables, tandis que le CNLP (Center for Natural Language Processing), de l’université de Syracuse (Etat de New York), peaufine un programme qui apprend à identifier les comportements suspects. A Atlanta, Nexidia planche sur les données audio-vidéo. Dans la Silicon Valley, Inxight améliore l’agrégation des informations. Andrew More et Jeff Schneider, de l’université Carnegie-Mellon, à Pittsburgh, combinent probabilités et datamining. En Virginie, la firme SRA International travaille sur l’extraction de données, etc.

Le financement ? Aucun problème. Depuis le 11 septembre 2001, les fonds publics consacrés à ces recherches ont été démultipliés. Et les investisseurs privés voient là un bon moyen de concilier patriotisme et business. « En 2004, rien qu’en recherche-développement, les agences fédérales vont consacrer plus de 3,5 milliards de dollars à la sécurité intérieure, c’est-à-dire à l’antiterrorisme », a calculé Serge Hagège, attaché pour la science et la technologie à l’ambassade de France aux Etats-Unis.

Dans le privé, une mini-bulle spéculative s’est même formée autour de ces activités de surveillance. « Toutes les entreprises qui travaillent dans le datamining ont le vent en poupe », confirme Timothy Quillin, analyste financier chez Stephens, une banque de gestion de portefeuilles et un des rares spécialistes de l’informatique de défense et de sécurité. En Bourse, les investisseurs parient sur les groupes proposant des solutions complètes aux agences fédérales. En 2003, SRA International a ainsi vu son action progresser de 40 %.

Mais cette fièvre sécuritaire a également contaminé le capital-risque, qui a vu éclore des fonds voués à la défense et à la sécurité. Modèle du genre ? Le Homeland Security Fund, de Paladin Capital Group, à Washington, qui finance la protection des réseaux informatiques et des logiciels ou l’analyse de fichiers audio et vidéo. Or, deux des patrons de Paladin connaissent bien les besoins des services secrets : James Woolsey a dirigé la CIA et Kenneth Minihan, la NSA (National Security Agency).

Des chercheurs motivés, de l’argent à profusion… En dehors des problèmes de faisabilité technique, il semble n’y avoir qu’un obstacle à la construction de cette cyber « ligne Maginot » autour des Etats-Unis : les associations américaines de défense des droits de l’homme (lire page suivante). Sous leur pression, le gouvernement a renoncé à son projet initial : mettre en fiches l’humanité ou presque. L’IAO (Information Awareness Office), dirigé par l’amiral John Poindexter et doté d’un budget de près de 600 millions de dollars sur quatre ans, devait développer le projet Total Information Awareness (TIA), un gigantesque système capable d’accumuler des informations sur n’importe quel individu.

En septembre dernier, le TIA a été officiellement arrêté devant l’inquiétude du Congrès, et les agences de renseignement ont interdiction d’utiliser ce qui existait déjà du projet pour espionner des citoyens américains aux Etats-Unis. Dans le même temps, l’IAO a disparu des organigrammes. Mais la retraite du gouvernement n’a été qu’une stratégie de façade. « Les composantes du TIA ont été dispersées entre différentes agences fédérales », estime Steven Aftergood, responsable de la mission « Secret d’Etat » au sein de la FAS, la Fédération des scientifiques américains (3.000 personnalités, dont 50 Prix Nobel). Et, comme par hasard, l’Arda (agence de recherche des services secrets américains) finance actuellement un programme, NIMD (Novel Intelligence from Massive Data), très proche du TIA…

Dernier épisode en date : la semaine dernière, George W. Bush a profité de son discours sur l’Etat de l’Union pour appeler les législateurs à renouveler certaines clauses du Patriot Act. Ces clauses, qui concernent la surveillance des communications électroniques des individus, étaient censées expirer fin 2005.

Jacques Henno (article paru dans le quotidien Les Echos le 28 janvier 2004)

Reportage en Suède sur la nouvelle frontière de la révolution Internet : l’Internet mobile

Pour Tom Söderlund, tout a commencé par un… jeu ou plus exactement un concours de création d’entreprises. C’est là que ce jeune Suédois, a rencontré début 2000, les trois associés avec lesquels il a fondé sa start-up, It’s alive. Agé aujourd’hui de 25 ans, il dirige une équipe de dix ingénieurs, spécialiste des jeux sur téléphone mobile. Chaque jour, pas moins de 1 500 Stockholmois s’adonnent, sur leur portable, à BotFighters (« les combattants robots »). Le principe ? Après vous être inscrit en ligne, vous envoyez un SMS au serveur de BotFighter. L’ordinateur localise votre téléphone et vous indique si un autre joueur est à proximité. A vous, ensuite, de vous approcher pour le détruire : quand vous êtes à portée, vous envoyez un SMS demandant son élimination, virtuelle, bien sûr…

Ici, BotFighters est pris très au sérieux. Tous les financiers, ingénieurs et entrepreneurs du pays sont en effet persuadés que l’Internet mobile constituera, dans quelques mois, un nouvel Eldorado. L’Internet mobile ? « C’est la possibilité d’accéder à tous les services de la Toile – jeux, e-mail, forum, sites web – depuis n’importe quel terminal mobile, téléphone ou PDA », détaille Sven-Christer Nilsson, co-fondateur de Start-upfactory, une firme de capital-risque. Lui-même connaît bien le sujet : il était auparavant P-DG d’… Ericsson ! « Dans dix ans maximum, l’Internet sans fil sera partout », pronostique-t-il.

Cet enthousiasme national pour les nouvelles technologies ne date pas d’hier. Les neuf millions de Suédois sont sur-équipés en matériel : fin 2000, 71% des ménages possédaient un téléphone mobile et 48% un accès internet (en France, à la même époque les chiffres étaient, respectivement, de 44% et 12% !). Un pays étendu, une population dispersée, un médiocre réseau routier… les Suédois ont rapidement adopté ces nouveaux moyens de communication ! Ajoutez à cela un gouvernement compréhensif : « Ici, une licence pour un réseau téléphonique UMTS coûte moins de 100 000 couronnes (11 000 euros, NDLR) », révèle Arne Granholm, du ministère des télécommunications (en France, le prix d’une licence est de 619 millions d’euros, 4 milliards de francs ). Saupoudrez le tout d’un influent complexe militaro-industriel, gros consommateur d’électroniques, ainsi que d’un excellent système éducatif, et vous obtiendrez une économie tournée vers le high-tech : dans la région de Stockholm, près d’un salarié sur dix travaille dans les technologies de l’information !

Résultat, pour tout ce qui touche à la téléphonie mobile, la Suède est considérée, à l’instar du Japon, comme un laboratoire grandeur nature. Ce qui se passe ici aujourd’hui arrivera demain dans le reste de l’Europe.
Pour concevoir l’Internet mobile des prochaines années, les Suédois se concentrent sur trois activités : les jeux en ligne, les MMS (Multimedia messaging systems), sortes de SMS super-sophistiqués, et le concept d’E-street, la rue commerçante électronique.
Le marché des jeux est le plus disputé. Une pléiade de jeunes entreprises suédoises s’y affrontent : It’s Alive, Bluefactory, Gamefederation, Terraplay… «Mais nous sommes sur un créneau très porteur, estime Stefan Nilsson, du département marketing de Terraplay. Les cabinets d’études prévoient qu’en 2005 les jeux sur terminaux mobiles représenteront en Europe un marché de 2,21 milliards d’euros (14,5 milliards de francs, NDLR).» Mais pour l’instant, ces activités sont embryonnaires. Et les jeux rudimentaires. Ils consistent essentiellement à des échanges de SMS, du style : «Vous êtes touché ! Vous avez du jus de banane partout » (Banana battle , de Bluefactory).

Les choses devraient s’améliorer avec les MMS, les SMS multimédia. « Ils vous permettront d’échanger avec vos amis du texte, des images, du son, de la vidéo, le tout par portables interposés et en moins de deux secondes, décrit, prototype en main, Christoffer Andersson, de la division GPRS d’Ericsson. Regardez : en quelques clics, je regroupe dans un même MMS un petit texte, un smiley et une musique sympa pour souhaiter une bonne journée à ma femme. » Mieux, lors d’une compétition de hockey, en février dernier, à Stockholm, Ericsson avait équipé un joueur d’électrodes, pour mesurer son rythme cardiaque. Quelques privilégiés ont reçu sur leur PDA des vidéos en direct des matchs, avec en fond sonore, ces battements de cœur ! « Croyez-moi, on s’y serait crû », insiste Lars Brindt, responsable, chez Ericsson, des recherches avancées dans le domaine du wireless.

Autre expérience, cette fois à Luleå, une ville du Nord : 15 magasins et 2 500 habitants participent à un programme d’E-street. Les consommateurs ont enregistré leurs profils dans une base de données et chaque fois qu’ils passent à côté d’une échoppe faisant une promotion susceptible de les intéresser, un MMS leur est envoyé. Exemple : « Aujourd’hui, manteau d’hiver en promotion. KappAhl Luleå, 51 rue Storg » Et, à terme, le chaland obtiendra un plan pour arriver à destination. Il pourra même s’inscrire dans une file d’attente virtuelle. Très utile pour les banques et les services administratifs : lorsque un guichet sera sur le point de se libérer, le système enverra un message sur votre portable ! Décidément, à en croire les Suédois, notre téléphone portable sera, demain, le Sésame de toute notre vie !

De notre envoyé spécial en Suède, Jacques Henno
(article paru dans le numéro de février 2002 du mensuel Web Magazine)

Comment on suit les produits à la trace

Madame Martin choisit une barquette de beefsteak et se dirige aussitôt vers la borne interactive installée devant le rayon boucherie. Elle saisit le code que porte l’emballage et, immédiatement, apparaît à l’écran la fiche d’identité de l’animal abattu : une vache de 10 ans, de race charolaise. Un clique de plus et notre ménagère obtient les coordonnées de l’éleveur, Serge Hellouin, à Ondefontaine, dans le Calvados. Rassurée sur l’origine, bien française de son beefsteak, madame Martin poursuit ses courses… Voilà plusieurs mois que les clients de l’hypermarché Continent d’Ormesson-sur-Marne, près de Paris, peuvent vérifier l’origine de la viande qu’ils achètent. Pour parvenir à ce degré de précision, le distributeur et son fournisseur, Soviba ont développé une énorme base de données, qui conserve le numéro d’identification du bovin, la date et l’heure d’abattage, etc.

A l’instar de Continent et de Soviba, de plus en plus d’entreprises agro-alimentaires suivent leurs produits à la trace, depuis l’usine jusqu’à la livraison chez le distributeur ou le consommateur final. C’est le fameux principe de traçabilité, que les industriels mettent en avant, pour rassurer le public, à chaque nouvel accident : fromages aux listeria, vaches folles, fongicide sur des canettes de Coca, cochons ou poulets à la dioxine… Mais ce système de sécurité est également utilisé pour les voitures, les pièces d’avion, les cosmétiques, les médicaments ou les jouets. Un établissement de transfusion sanguine découvre qu’un de ses donneurs souffre d’une maladie contagieuse ? Le suivi informatique permet d’avertir tous les patients susceptibles d’avoir été contaminés. De même, si un garagiste trouve un boulon mal serré sur une voiture neuve, on peut remonter la chaîne de production, identifier l’origine du défaut et localiser tous les véhicules concernés. «La traçabilité, c’est comme les cailloux du Petit Poucet, on retrouve son chemin dans les deux sens : du fabricant au consommateur, et réciproquement», résume Alain Peretti, directeur d’une coopérative agricole, la Caps, à Sens, où les sacs de blé font l’objet d’un suivi draconien.

Mais ces procédures de surveillance ne servent pas qu’en cas de crise. Dans l’agro-alimentaire, elles constituent aussi un argument de vente : de plus en plus d’entreprises du secteur n’hésitent pas à parler, dans leur communication, de traçabilité. Elles rappellent que ce système permet de garantir l’origine d’un produit (viande française, par exemple) ou sa composition (absence d’OGM, les fameux organismes génétiquement modifiés). Objectif : rassurer les Français, de plus en plus exigeants sur la qualité de leur nourriture. Le groupe français Bourgoin, un des leaders européens de la volaille, a ainsi créé, début septembre, une filière 100% naturelle pour les poulets de la marque Duc : le soja servi aux animaux est certifié sans OGM. Pour cela, un «tracking» (suivi) a été mis en place tout au long de la chaîne alimentaire, depuis les champs de soja jusqu’aux barquettes de blanc de poulet. Les premiers résultats de ces expériences sont plutôt encourageants. «Depuis l’installation de la borne interactive dans cet hypermarché, les ventes de viande y sont en constante augmentation», affirme Eric Leroux, responsable du département «boucheries» chez Continent.

Le grand public commence à peine à se familiariser avec la notion de traçabilité. Mais, pour les industriels, il s’agit d’une vieille technique. Ils l’ont mis en pratique dès le milieu des années quatre-vingt. Non pour des motifs de sécurité, mais pour des raisons financières. A l’époque, il s’agissait simplement de s’assurer que les commandes des clients étaient transmises, sans erreur, à tous les échelons de l’entreprise : usine, logistique, etc. Puis, l’administration française s’y est intéressée aux début des années quatre-vingt dix. Pour faciliter les rappels de produits défectueux, elle a imposé, en 1991, la traçabilité «par lots» (on sait retrouver un lot de produits) pour les denrées alimentaires, les médicaments et les cosmétiques. Mais, depuis, plusieurs entreprises ont perfectionné le système et appliquent une traçabilité «individuelle» (elles peuvent localiser les produits un par un).

Dans l’agro-alimentaire et la pharmacie, mais aussi le jouet ou l’électroménager, la plupart des industriels se contente d’une traçabilité par lots : ils affectent le même numéro à tous les articles fabriqués le même jour dans la même usine. Exemple concret, dans l’alimentaire, chez Lactalis, à Saint-Maclou (Normandie). Dans cette usine du groupe Besnier, où est fabriqué le camembert Le Petit, le lait est fourni par 400 exploitants. Il est regroupé dans trois cuves, en fonction des tournées de ramassage. Chacune de ces citernes ne sert à fabriquer qu’une seule série de fromages. «Nous imprimons sur les emballages le numéro du réservoir utilisé et la date de fabrication», précise Jacques Frankinet, directeur de la qualité. Cette information est reportée sur les palettes livrées aux grossistes ou aux centrales d’achat.

Sur le papier, ce système, peu onéreux, est fiable. Si un producteur livre du lait impropre à la consommation (trace de dioxine par exemple), Jacques Frankinet identifie le camion qui est passé dans cette exploitation, puis la cuve contaminée et, à partir de là, tous les fromages impropres à la consommation. Mais la procédure de retrait devient vite un vrai casse-tête. Pour seulement 1 000 litres de lait suspects (et mélangés, dans la citerne à 40 autres livraisons), il faut détruire 25 000 fromages. Coût de l’opération : plus de 2 millions de francs… Il y a pire. Cet été, Coca-Cola a dû retirer de la vente, en Belgique, en France et au Luxembourg, des millions de canettes contaminées par du soufre ou du phénol. La facture aurait dépassé les 600 millions de francs !

Les procédures de tracking sont similaires dans l’industrie du jouet. Ainsi, chez Berchet, à Oyonnax, dans l’Ain, on se contente d’imprimer la date de fabrication sur les emballages. «Je sais quels composants ont été utilisés tel jour, assure Patrick Nappez, responsable qualité. Si, par exemple, je découvre un problème sur une fixation, je peux retrouver tous les lots de chevaux à bascules concernés.» Mais, là encore, par précaution il faut tout rapatrier en usine. Et, plus les lots sont importants, plus l’opération coûte cher. L’an dernier, Lego a déboursé plus de 50 millions de francs pour le retrait de 700 000 hochets dans toute l’Europe.

Pour tous les produits à très forte valeur (automobiles, avions…), les industriels ne peuvent pas procéder de façon aussi grossière. Les opérations de rappel deviendraient vite ruineuses. Les responsables de Citroën estiment ainsi que l’échange de réservoir auquel ils sont en train de procéder sur des Xantia fonctionnant au GPL, va leur coûter près de 6 millions de francs (lire l’encadré ci-dessous). «Pourtant, seuls 600 véhicules sont concernés», précise Bernard Troadec, directeur du département «après-vente» de Citroën. Pour prévenir tout dérapage, les entreprises peuvent alors opter pour une traçabilité totale, permettant de suivre individuellement chaque produit. Dans certaines filières, comme celle de la transfusion sanguine, où le moindre incident pourrait avoir d’effroyables conséquences sanitaires, ce suivi draconien est même imposé par la réglementation. Enfin, quelques industriels de l’agro-alimentaire, on l’a vu, s’y sont mis, mais pour des raisons marketing.

Deux éléments sont nécessaires pour obtenir un «tracking» parfait : un numéro d’identification (une «étiquette» en quelque sorte), infalsifiable, pour repérer chaque article ; puis, pour suivre ses déplacements, de puissants ordinateurs.

Première étape, donc, la mise au point d’un «identifiant». Dans certains secteurs, cela ne pose pas trop de problème. Ainsi, les constructeurs automobiles ont pris depuis longtemps l’habitude d’apposer un VIN («Vehicule identification number» ou numéro d’identification du véhicule) sur toutes leurs voitures. Ce matricule, gravé sur la plaque du véhicule, dans le compartiment moteur, et frappé à froid sur le châssis est difficilement effaçable (c’est ce numéro que l’on retrouve également sur les cartes grises françaises). Même principe dans l’aéronautique : «Sur un Airbus, plus d’un millier de pièces portent un numéro d’identification individuel», révèle Maurice Azéma, le Monsieur «qualité» du programme Airbus, chez Aerospatiale-Matra. En revanche, apposer un numéro sur un animal s’avère plus délicat. Lorsque la traçabilité des veaux est devenue obligatoire dans notre pays, il n’y avait aucun précédent. Au départ, en 1978, ce suivi répondait à un simple souci d’amélioration des races bovines. Depuis 1984, il permet également de vérifier que les éleveurs ne «gonflent» pas les effectifs de leurs troupeaux, dans l’espoir d’obtenir des subventions européennes plus importantes… Mais ce n’est qu’en 1996, avec la crise de la vache folle, que les experts lui ont trouvé une application sanitaire.

Le système d’identification retenu est particulièrement contraignant pour les agriculteurs. Dans les sept jours qui suivent la naissance d’un veau, l’éleveur doit poser une boucle en plastique, de couleur saumon, sur chaque oreille de l’animal. Seules deux sociétés, Chevillot, à Albi, et Reydet, près de Cluse, fabriquent ces pendeloques. Celles-ci ne sont remises qu’aux exploitations exemptes d’EBS (encéphalite bovine spongiforme) et respectant des consignes alimentaires strictes (pas de viandes animales…). Elles comportent un matricule à 10 chiffres, véritable numéro de sécurité social de la bête, fourni par l’administration. Ce matricule est reporté sur un document rose, infalsifiable, grâce aux filigranes qu’il comporte et à l’encre spéciale avec laquelle il est imprimé. Sur ce «passeport» va être enregistrée toute la vie de l’animal : sa date de naissance, les élevages qu’il a fréquentés, les maladies qu’il a développées, etc. Lorsqu’un veau arrive à l’abattoir, les vétérinaires vérifient que les numéros des boucles et du passeport coïncident. Si c’est bien le cas, l’animal est abattu et sa carcasse découpée.

Officiellement, ce système est très fiable. «Entre 1996 et 1998, nous n’avons constaté que 366 fraudes dans les abattoirs», indique-t-on à la DGCCRF (Direction générale de la concurrence, de la consommation et de la répression des fraudes), le gendarme de l’alimentaire. Problème : ce chiffre est trompeur. Car seulement 48 500 contrôles ont été effectués. Une peccadille comparée aux 6 millions de bovins qui sont abattus chaque année. Or, la tentation est parfois grande de tricher. «Une boucle, ça se coupe, ça se remplace…», souffle un spécialiste du secteur.

Pour prévenir ce genre d’«accidents», la Communauté européenne finance la mise au point de boucles électroniques, inviolables. Nom de code du projet : Idea (identification électronique des animaux). «Il s’agit d’une étiquette-radio, semblable à celles utilisées pour les télépéages d’autoroute, explique Jacques Delacroix, chef du service “identification” à l’Institut de l’élevage. On peut la lire à distance et donc l’implanter dans un endroit inaccessible.» Première application en France, où des chercheurs ont fait avaler à quelque 25 000 bovins des puces électroniques enrobées de céramique. Ces mini-émetteurs resteront dans leur estomac toute leur vie. Là, on ne peut ni les retirer, ni les modifier.

Dernière étape : le suivi informatique. Tant que les produits sont en atelier, ils sont pris en charge par les systèmes de GPAO (gestion de production assistée par ordinateur), installés dans les années quatre-vingt. Deux exemples concrets dans l’alimentaire : chez Soviba, troisième producteur de viande bovine en France, chaque abattoir dispose d’une centaine de PC et de scanners qui permettent d’enregistrer les déplacements des carcasses ; même principe à la Caps, la coopérative agricole de Sens, où les ouvriers disposent de 50 terminaux, reliés à un ordinateur central.

Mais, parfois, l’homme n’a même pas à intervenir. Dans l’industrie automobile, par exemple, tout devient automatique : chez Mercedes, des caméras lisent les code-barres apposés sur les cartons de pièces détachées livrés par les sous-traitants ; et des boîtiers électroniques, fixés sur les véhicules en cours de montage, enregistrent chaque intervention.

A la sortie, toutes ces informations sont basculées dans une immense base de données. Les abattoirs Soviba sont ainsi capables de dire comment ont été conditionnées et à quels grossistes ont été expédiées les carcasses des 20 000 bovins et 80 000 porcs qui sont tués chaque mois. Ces dossiers sont conservés pendant un an. Ce dispositif revient à moins de 15 centimes par barquette de viande. Autre exemple, dans l’automobile, cette fois : Citroën dispose pour chaque véhicule fabriqué d’une fiche informatique comportant son matricule, bien sûr, mais également les référence de ses 400 principaux composants (moteur, boîte de vitesse, freins, suspension…), ainsi que le nom du concessionnaire à qui il a été livré. «En cas de problème sur un lot de climatiseurs, par exemple, je peux immédiatement identifier les voitures touchées par ce défaut et avertir nos concessionnaires», explique Bernard Troadec, du service après-vente.

Beaucoup de progrès restent cependant à faire dans le domaine de la traçabilité. Par exemple, pour les OGM, les fameux organismes génétiquement modifiés : «Vous ne pouvez pas détecter les OGM dans les aliments cuits», révèle Rémi Alary, de l’Inra (Institut national de la recherche agronomique) (lire l’encadré ci-dessous). Enfin, dans certains cas, la traçabilité ne sert pas à grand chose. Ainsi, les autorités sanitaires belges avaient mis en place un tracking ultra-sophistiqué pour les cochons : Outre-Quiévrain chaque goret porte à l’oreille droite une pastille d’identification. Mais, dans le scandale du porc à la dioxine, qui défraye la chronique depuis cinq mois, ce dispositif n’a été d’aucune utilité. Et pour cause : «Tous nos porcs avaient mangé des graisses contenant de la dioxine», regrette Luc Laengelé, vétérinaire-directeur au ministère de l’Agriculture belge. 200 000 cochons ont dû être abattus. Quel gâchis !

Encadré OGM

Les OGM (organismes génétiquement modifiés) sont des végétaux, comme le maïs ou le soja dans lesquels on a incorporé, en laboratoire, le gène d’une autre plante, d’un animal ou d’un virus. Ils deviennent ainsi plus résistants aux parasites et maladies, ce qui augmente la productivité des exploitations agricoles. Prend-on un risque en consommant des OGM ou des aliments préparés à base d’OGM ? Selon certains experts, ces organismes transgénique sont totalement inoffensifs. Pour d’autres, au contraire, le gène modifié pourrait être transmis à l’homme pendant la digestion.

En raison de cette incertitude, les consommateurs veulent être avertis de la présence éventuelle d’OGM dans la nourriture qu’ils achètent. Un règlement européen prévoit bien l’étiquetage de tous les produits contenant du maïs ou du soja transgénique. Mais les  directives d’application se font toujours attendre.

De toute façon, il faudra croire sur paroles les industriels qui présenteront leurs produits comme étant «naturels» ou «biologiques». S’il est très facile de repérer les aliments de bases  (maïs…) génétiquement modifiés, cela devient très difficile dans les préparations culinaires. «Souvent le processus industriel détruit le code génétique des OGM, ce qui empêche tout contrôle», explique Rémi Alary, de l’Inra (Institut national de la recherche agronomique). Dans les autres cas, la technique PCR (Polymerase chain reaction) permet de détecter la présence de transgènes. Coût : 1 500 francs.

Encadré Voiture

Dimanche 31 janvier 1999, à Vénissieux, près de Lyon : trois mineurs mettent le feu à une voiture roulant au GPL (gaz de pétrole liquéfié). Arrivés sur les lieux quelques minutes plus tard, les pompiers tentent d’éteindre l’incendie. Le réservoir explose, blessant grièvement un des soldats du feu. Depuis la réglementation sur les réservoirs de GPL a été modifiée par l’administration française. Alors que cela leur était interdit auparavant, les constructeurs automobiles peuvent désormais installer des bouchons de sécurité, qui libèrent le gaz en cas de suppression.

La direction de Citroën a décidé de modifier 600 Xantia «GPL» déjà en circulation. La base de données de l’entreprise a permis d’identifier les concessionnaires qui avaient vendu ce modèle. Ces derniers ont envoyé en mai 1999 une lettre aux conducteurs, les invitant à passer au garage à partir du mois de septembre. Au cas, où ils avaient déjà revendu leur véhicule, ils leur étaient demandés de bien vouloir indiquer le nom du nouveau propriétaire. Si nécessaire, Citroën pourra consulter le fichier des cartes grises. Au total, l’opération devrait s’étaler sur un an et coûter près de 6 millions de francs.

Internet, téléphone mobile, jeux vidéo… la révolution numérique affecte toute notre vie